dark chocolate in a teal bowl

Can dark chocolate improve our eyesight?

Chocolate lovers rejoice!
Recent research by the University of the Incarnate Word, Rosenberg School of Optometry, in San Antonio, Texas USA, suggests that eating dark chocolate could improve visual clarity.

dark chocolate in a teal bowlBars with more than 72% cacao increase ocular blood flow which enhances macular function and sharpens the ability to read words and numbers.

The new research tested people 2 hours after eating 47g of 72% Cacao dark chocolate, and again after 40g milk chocolate in separate sessions more than 3 days apart. The testing looked at various aspects of visual performance.

More than 70% of people scored significantly higher after eating the dark chocolate. The biggest improvement was in contrast sensitivity, which helps us see in low light, or when text is poorly printed. Another area that improved was visual acuity – a measure of the sharpness of vision.

Cacao beans are rich in flavanol, an organic compound which improves blood flow in the brain and cardiovascular system and aids in reducing inflammation.

Researchers proposed increases in blood flow could explain the improvements, but suggested more work needs to be done to understand the exact mechanism. In the meantime we think it sounds like a good excuse to load up on dark chocolate and do some private testing. Sounds like a delicious experiment.


Top 10 Contact Lens Tips

Remember when you first started wearing contact lenses? You may have found it was a little daunting in the beginning. The process of inserting and removing the lenses, getting comfortable touching your eyeball and then there’s all the hygiene protocols to follow. Along the way it’s easy to forget the “must dos” for good eye health and vision. So to help you out we’ve compiled our top ten tips for contact lens wearers – you’re welcome.

  1. Wash your hands before touching your lens

If you don’t, you risk cross contamination by depositing microorganisms from your hands to the lens thus increasing your risk for infection. You could for example, end up with conjunctivitis or a more serious corneal infection, which can increase the risk of permanent vision loss. When washing your hands, use a disinfected soap and dry them with a paper towel to avoid getting lint in your eyes.

  1. Check that your lens isn’t inside out and is not torn

Wearing the lens the wrong way generally won’t affect your vision but it may feel uncomfortable. Likewise, a torn lens can cause irritation so best to keep your fingernails short to help avoid accidentally ripping your lenses. 

  1. Have eye drops on hand

Healthy eyes need to stay moisturised and contact lenses may make your eyes feel drier than usual especially if you are in air-conditioning. Your local EyeQ optometrist can recommend which eye drop will be best suited to your individual needs.

  1. Wash your case after each use

If you’re being totally honest with yourself, how often do you wash your contact lens case? (is that crickets we hear)? Contact lens cases are susceptible to bacterial growth which means if you’re not cleaning your case regularly you are likely creating a breeding ground for germs. Best practice suggests disposing of the old solution, rinsing it out with fresh solution, wiping it with a clean tissue or paper towel and leaving it to air dry face down with the caps off.

  1. Replace your case regularly

Even if your case looks brand spanking new it’s really important to replace it every three months. A biofilm can form in your case helping bacteria hide from the disinfectant in your contact lens solution which again doesn’t support healthy eyes.

  1. Store your contact lens case in a clean, low humidity environment

While it makes practical sense to keep your contact lenses in the bathroom it’s probably not the best idea (how super impractical)!

You may be surprised that cultures of contact lens cases have found faecal matter in them, which occurs when the case is kept in the bathroom without the lens caps on, flushing the toilet creates a mist of spray that settles inside the case, yuck!

  1. Only wear your contact lenses for the recommended time

Follow your optometrist’s instructions regarding the length of time to wear and use your lenses. For example, if the lenses are designed to be replaced every month don’t wear them for two. Your risk of serious eye infections increases if you overwear your contacts.

  1. Don’t sleep in your contact lenses

Unless your optometrist has advised you to do so it’s important that you don’t ever sleep in your contact lenses. Doing so drastically increases your risk of eye infection. The contact lens limits your eyes from getting oxygen and hydration which it needs to fight off any microbial invasion.

  1. Insert your contact lenses before applying make-up

Once you’ve washed your hands you should insert your contacts before applying moisturiser or make-up.  It’s easy for any residue left on your fingers to make its way into your eyes or onto your contact lenses.

  1. Consider daily disposable lenses

There are two major benefits to wearing daily disposable contact lenses. Firstly, they are super convenient as no lens cleaning or maintenance is required. You literally wear your lenses for the day and throw them out once removed. Bye-bye contact lens cases!

The other and more significant benefit is that daily contact lenses are healthier for your eyes as there’s a decreased risk of corneal infection.

 

Make an appointment to speak to our optometrist regarding your contact lens wear and cleaning practices if you have any questions or concerns.


Why do my eyes hurt in the cold?

One very common and frustrating eye issue that increases in its prevalence over winter is dry eye. The colder temperature can cause your eyes to lose natural moisture, becoming dry and sore. Although this isn’t usually a serious condition, it can cause discomfort. Here are out top tips to ease the symptoms of dry eye and keep your eyes healthy this winter.


May is Macular Degeneration Awareness Month

inFOCUS this month... an annual awareness campaign to help Australians understand their risk of macular disease. May is Macular Degeneration Awareness Month. 

Macular disease covers a range of painless conditions affecting the central retina, known as the macula, which sits at the back of the eye. This disease is unfortunately the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Australia. 

The macula is responsible for detailed central vision used for activities such as reading, driving and recognising faces. It’s also responsible for most of your colour vision and it is only early detection and intervention that will save your sight.   

checkmymacula.com.au offer a quick quiz to assess your risk however the best course of action is to maintain regular eye checks and ensure you reach out to us if you notice any changes with your vision, especially when reading or driving.


School is back!

School is back and now is a great time to make an appointment to get your child's eyes tested either for the first time, or to get that review appointment that they may be due for.

Poor eyesight may cause learning and behaviour problems, which might be blamed on other things. This is especially true for young children, who may find it difficult to explain the difficulties they are having with their eyesight. They may not even be aware they have a problem at all.

Please book an appointment online or give us a call on 3899 4044.

We hope to see you soon.


Start the new year off with a fresh new look!

Start the new year off with a fresh new look! Many of the health funds re-set at the beginning of the year, so now might be a great time to use your new health benefits and enjoy little or no gap payment! Book an appointment online or visit our practice today a choose from our range of stylish spectacles.